The Season of Hope: A Short Story

Merry Christmas (or anything you celebrate) you guys! In honor of the celebration, I’m going to give you a story I have written about the holidays. This is the first time I’ve ever written a short story but I’m giving it a shot.

In truth, I was going to give you the first chapter of the first story I wrote when I was ten, but I almost had a panic attack once I had hit the publish button so here’s my alternative:

frosty

The Season of Hope: A Short Story

The sun was going down over the mountainous terrain where we lived but we weren’t done for the day.

My daughter Lorraine and I trekked through the cold snow, our socks getting soaked from the melting of it. Lorraine’s nose was red and she kept sniffling either from the cold or from crying, I wasn’t sure.

Her short legs would not be able to keep up for much longer but I didn’t know if I was going to be able to live watching my little girl grieve.

I reached down and picked her up, slinging her over my head and rested her on my shoulders. “It’ll be okay, Lorraine,” I told the crying five year old. “We’ll find her.” But I was almost positive that we wouldn’t find this schnauzer puppy who’s fur was as white as the snow and legs as thick as it.

“I know, Daddy,” she told me back. Her voice was still light despite the harshness of the situation. Leave it to a five year old to have hope in times like these.

This dog, Cupcake, was her mother’s. Cupcake was just birthed when Maggie bought her and she intended it to be the family dog. It was only after the dog literally didn’t leave her side that we declared her Maggie’s dog.

That all changed when she died just two days before. It was also two days before Christmas when she was ripped away from us, leaving Lorraine motherless.

I said she could have Cupcake after that, but apparently Cupcake did not agree. While Lorraine and I, knee deep in the snow, built the snowman that sat in our yard every year, Cupcake ran. Lorraine immediately started crying, so I grabbed her hand and pulled her through the miles and miles of snow behind our rural house.

“Do you hear that, Daddy?” Lorraine asked, tapping lightly on my head with her fingers. “It’s Mommy’s favorite song.”

And she was right. Jingle Bell Rock sounded through the area but I could not pinpoint where it came from. The blizzard thrashing violently at my eyes made it hard to see anything. It would be a miracle if we even found the dog in the white vastness.

“Do you think Mommy has Cupcake and she’s waiting for us?”

“I don’t know, Lori,” I told her, holding tighter on her legs. She was aware that Maggie was  no longer with us, but she constantly reminded me that she might still be here, doing things to get us to see her.

“I think so. Maybe Cupcake ran away so he could be with Mommy. Maybe he doesn’t want to be found.”

I pulled her off my shoulders and put her on the ground, her back facing the impact of the snow as I knelt down in front of her. “Lorraine,” I held back my sobs that were making my throat sting and my heart ache. I took a deep breath and continued. “Cupcake loved Mommy and Mommy loved Cupcake, but Mommy would want you to be happy with Cupcake. She wouldn’t take her from you.”

“Are we going to keep looking?” she asked, rubbing her eyes. It was extremely past her bedtime and she still hadn’t eaten dinner. This little girl was making my heart beat faster than ever.

“No, my sweet girl. I think it’s time for us to go back home.” She just nodded and didn’t say anything else.

I picked her up and gave her a kiss on the cheek before letting her sit on my shoulders, her forehead on my crown, as we made our way back home without the dog. I looked back once before we headed back and saw the sow flickering of the Christmas lights, no doubt the source of the music.

Maybe it was a sign from Maggie, telling me to keep going to keep looking, but I couldn’t know for sure. You can never know for sure unless you had hope and if there was one thing I didn’t have, it was hope.

It took an hour for us to get back to our small little cottage that Maggie had picked out herself, the half made snowman covered already with a pile of snow.

Another smaller pile of snow sat by the door and I pushed off the first layer to reveal a thick coat of fur. My joy must have woken Lorraine because she lifted her head and started laughing.”Cupcake!” she yelled. I put her down and she unzipped her large coat to let the dog snuggle up with her.

I hurried both of them inside of the warm house and covered them up with blankets.

Making hot chocolate for Lorraine, I watched as she stroked the puppy, cooing to it. Cupcake was just as happy to see her as she was to see Cupcake.

I passed Lorraine her mug and she took a sip. “You know, Daddy. Before Mommy got sick, she told me to never give up hope because it can always bring you home. She must have told Cupcake the same thing.”

I laughed and kissed her as I put another large blanket on both of them and silently thanked Maggie for blessing me with such a wonderful daughter and for blessing my daughter with a small piece of herself. Cupcake the dog was our Christmas miracle.

After that, I never gave up hope.

______________________________________________

I really hoped you liked it! It took me a while to write it and I’m sorry if it was a little sad.

Have a very happy holiday filled with hope and love. Eat tons of cookies and pies and all of the good things! 😙

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6 thoughts on “The Season of Hope: A Short Story

  1. What a wonderful story!!! Awesome job!!! It was heartwarming and had a lovely message. I hope you continue to write and post more short stories. They’re excellent. Merry Christmas! Hope you’ve had an excellent day 😀

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Pingback: Write for Yourself | Thoughts on Things | Jasmine's Writing Corner

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